Tagged: songwriting

Workin' Progress 0

Two New Songs & Workin’ Progress

Today, I’m proud to release two new songs. They’re called “There You Are” and “Something New”.

They’re going to be part of the next record which will be called Workin’ Progress. I decided on that name because I’m going to be creating the album as time goes by and releasing tracks as they’re finished, instead of waiting and releasing a big bunch of songs all at once. Hence, the album will be a work in progress until it’s finished.

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Mall Girl 0

Every Song Tells A Story: Mall Girl

The Story

“Mall Girl” has a long history. It was written in 1994 when I was a spry twenty-four year old. At that point, I had already been working in retail, usually in malls, for a number of years. I mainly worked in record stores or music stores. I was still single and in a band called “The Automatics”. It was a fun era that seems so distant now.

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Damaged Goods 1

Damaged Goods

I’ve been quite busy the past year writing, recording, re-recording, compiling, plotting, scheming, planning, and you get the idea.

I think that 14 songs seems like a good enough amount for a formal release. Why 14? No idea. It just seems like a good number to me. I already have more songs in the works that will probably end up on the second release unless I decide to squeeze some more onto this one. I’m enjoying the number 14 though. Paul Westerberg’s first official solo record (if you don’t count the Replacements’ All Shook Down as a Paul record) was called 14 Songs. So why not. There must be some good karma there someplace.

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Corporate Robot 0

Every Song Tells A Story: Corporate Robot

The Story

I enjoy humor in music. There are times to be cerebral and there are times to be just plain funny. I like making people laugh with a goofy lyric or idea. This song was meant to be humorous, of course, but underneath it all lies a thinly veiled satirical commentary on corporate America.

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Telecaster 0

Every Song Tells a Story

Art lends itself to interpretation. Thus, when it comes to most art forms, the artists tend to shy away from explaining themselves or the motivation behind their finished product. This way, each person can look or listen and take away something different. It’s a good concept that I have trouble disagreeing with.

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